Welcome to Jack O'Connell Web, your newest source for the british actor Jack O'Connell. You may recognize Jack from the television series "Skins" or from the films "Starred Up,", "Unbroken," and Money Monster." The site aims to provide you with all the latest news, photos, media, and more on Jack and his career. Please take a look around the site and visit again soon!
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emily • 04.29.2016 • 0 Comments

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2016 > Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES TIMES – There aren’t many young actors who wouldn’t be intimidated by costarring in a film with George Clooney and Julia Roberts and directed by Jodie Foster.

Except maybe for one who’s just finished working with Angelina Jolie.

When Jack O’Connell put himself on tape for Foster’s financial thriller “Money Monster,” he’d recently completed filming Jolie’s WWII movie “Unbroken.” The British actor was the lead in the 2014 film about Louis Zamperini, an Olympian who was captured as a prisoner of war. And after the movie came out, O’Connell found himself bombarded by questions about Jolie.

“The one I can’t really hack is, ‘What’s it like to be with said famous person?’ because I’m not sure what that is as a question. It’s not very specific,” the actor recalled by phone from London. “But that movie did help me promote myself in the States with work that I’m genuinely proud of.”

His pedigree impressed Foster, who said she auditioned hundreds of twentysomethings to act alongside Clooney and Roberts. She was looking to fill the part of Kyle Budwell, a blue-collar worker who takes financial advice from a popular television personality named Lee Gates (Clooney). When one of the TV host’s stock picks turns out to be a bust, Kyle loses $60,000 and, in a rage, he turns up on Gates’ set with a gun to take the production hostage.

“At first, I was concerned Jack might be too young,” Foster said of the actor, now 25. “But he has a face that’s lived and this amazing combination of someone who can be threatening and primitive but is also really lovable.”

“Money Monster” — which will debut at the Cannes Film Festival next month before it hits theaters on May 13 — marks the first film O’Connell has made in the United States. To prepare himself for the role, he spent time in Brooklyn, hanging out with firemen, riding on their truck and listening to their strong accents. He spent less time researching the stock market, which he said he has never dabbled in on his personal time.

“This was a guy who was promised some version of an American dream and the pot of gold, and he doesn’t get that,” said O’Connell. “There were certain crew members, including Jodie, who were rooting for Kyle and believed in his situation. That helped me to understand his reasoning.”

On set, Foster said, Clooney took O’Connell “under his wing.” “I don’t think Jack is impressed particularly by movie stars,” the filmmaker noted. “But George has a lot to impart to somebody like him, and Jack was open to listening.”

So what advice did Clooney offer to his young costar? O’Connell wouldn’t reveal any secret nuggets of wisdom but said he took the most away from learning that the 54-year-old still wrestles with insecurities at work.

“When you see an actor like George Clooney making the same mistakes that you do and asking the same questions you might ask,” said O’Connell, “it’s very reassuring to know that you don’t stand out as being difficult.”

emily • 03.13.2016 • 0 Comments

Jack has recently done a photoshoot for Mr Porter. Check out the outtakes in our gallery!

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2016 > Mr Porter

MR PORTERMr Jack O’Connell can’t stop rubbing his head. “Sorry,” he says. “I’ve just had me hair cut. It’s a bit addictive.” A high-and-tight – very high, very tight – he refers to it as his “publicity tour cut”. The on-set hairdresser demurred at first, telling him that he couldn’t cut it any shorter without getting the clippers out. Mr O’Connell’s response? “Best get the clippers out, then.”

He’s no stranger to the shaven-headed look. For his first major role, in Mr Shane Meadows’ This Is England, Mr O’Connell donned bovver boots, acid-washed denim and a Harrington jacket to play teenage skinhead “Pukey” Nicholls. This time around, though, he’s not out to make a fashion statement. “It’s just more practical, innit?” he says, running a hand back and forth across his head. “You don’t have to worry about it. With so many cameras around, you can’t help but become a little self-conscious.” Such is life for one of this generation’s most promising young actors.

In the 10 years since This Is England, the noise surrounding Mr O’Connell has been building steadily. First, he landed a plum role in cult teen TV drama Skins, as the charismatic lager lout James Cook – which he jokingly describes as “not much of a stretch at the time”. He followed this with a series of critically acclaimed movie appearances in films such as Harry Brown, ’71 and Starred Up. It wasn’t until 2014, though, when he was hand-picked by Ms Angelina Jolie to star in her second directorial project, Unbroken, that the noise became deafening.

And you get the feeling that this could just be the start: things are likely to shift up another gear in May when he takes the new ’do on tour to promote his next project, Money Monster. The movie tells the story of Lee Gates, the brash host of a business TV show and supposed guru on all things Wall Street, who is taken hostage live on air by an angry investor, played by Mr O’Connell, who has just lost his life savings on a bad tip. The cast and crew give a fairly accurate representation of the kind of company that Mr O’Connell now keeps: the movie’s director, Ms Jodie Foster, and his two co-stars, Mr George Clooney and Ms Julia Roberts, have five Oscars between them.

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emily • 10.21.2015 • 0 Comments

DEADLINE.COM – EXCLUSIVE: Nicholas Hoult and Jack O’Connell are circling A Life In The Day, the Tony Gittelson script about the life of Brian Epstein, who discovered and managed the Beatles from 1961-1967, before he died of a drug overdose at 32. Justin Chadwick (Tulip Fever) is in talks to direct the project, which David Permut will produce through his Permut Presentations banner along with Dylan Sellers’ Rivers Edge Films.

Rivers Edge has a strategic partnership with Kevin Frakes’ Palmstar Media that has Palmstar funding Sellers’ overhead, production and development costs. The two companies are committed to jointly produce four to five films with budgets between $20 million-$40 million.

This is still a fluid situation with no deals set, but if it all comes together, Hoult would play the flamboyant and gay Epstein, with O’Connell the brilliant but troubled John Lennon. The intense relationship between the two men has been the subject of much debate and analysis over the years. As recently as this week, Lennon’s widow Yoko Ono mused about the possibility that Epstein and Lennon had sex with each other. She was quoted in the Daily Beast as saying, “It was almost a love affair, but not quite. It was never consummated. But it was a pretty intense relationship.”

Chadwick, coming off the Weinstein Company period drama Tulip Fever — which also stars O’Connell — has a number of projects he’s choosing from with A Life In The Day believed to be near the top of the list for what would be his next project. Hoult is currently in pre-production on Sand Castle opposite Henry Cavill and Luke Evans. O’Connell has George Clooney-starrer Money Monster in post.

Chadwick is repped by Independent Talent Group in the UK and UTA in the U.S. Hoult is repped by 42 in the UK and UTA in the U.S. O’Connell is repped by Conway Van Gelder Grant in the UK and CAA in the U.S. Tony Gittelson is repped by ICM Partners and Donaldson & Callif.

emily • 10.21.2015 • 0 Comments

BBC.COM – Actor Jack O’Connell is to play a troubled snooker professional in a new play staged in the sport’s spiritual home, Sheffield’s Crucible Theatre.

The Crucible hosts snooker’s annual world championships as well as being one of the UK’s leading theatres.

The worlds of snooker and theatre will meet with the world premiere of The Nap, written by Richard Bean, who is best known for One Man, Two Guvnors.

O’Connell has made his name in films including Unbroken, ’71 and Starred Up.

Those performances helped him win the rising star prize at the Bafta film awards earlier this year.

In The Nap, he will take the role of Sheffield-born snooker player Dylan Spokes who, according to The Crucible, has to contend with “his ex-con Dad, local gangster Waxy Chuff and the snooker corruption squad”.

The play is described as a “comedy thriller” and will be staged next March, just before the snooker world championships, which take place every April.

The Nap will be directed by actor and The Crucible associate director Richard Wilson. Next week, Wilson will reprise his role as Victor Meldrew in TV sitcom One Foot in the Grave at a one-off fundraising event for the theatre.

The venue’s new season also includes new musical Flowers for Mrs Harris, based on the 1958 novel of the same name by Paul Gallico; revivals of A Raisin in the Sun and Waiting for Godot; and the regional premiere of Contractions by Mike Bartlett, who wrote BBC One’s recent drama Doctor Foster.

Sheffield Theatres artistic director Daniel Evans said: “This is, without doubt, our boldest season to date. We’re announcing seven original productions: three new plays, a new British musical, a regional premiere and two major revivals of 20th Century classics.”

emily • 09.24.2015 • 0 Comments

GQ-MAGAZINE.CO.UK – Jack O’ Connell caught our attention when he was cast in Skins back in 2009 and since then he’s established himself as one of the most talented British actors of his generation. Not to mention he’s worked alongside some of the biggest names on the planet from Angelina Jolie’s Unbroken to George Clooney in next year’s Money Monster. Here’s a preview of the bad boy of acting’s cover interview and shoot…

On George Clooney (his co-star in Money Monster):

“On all fronts, in terms of the events he goes to, the charities he represents, the humanitarian work that he does. He set a good example for me. He’s a good man. We had a good laugh.”

On his past brushes with the law:

“I still have to remind myself to stay focused. Less so these days, but I am still nervous of what happens in my own time. I might react badly in certain situations that might hinder my future. So at the moment I’m between jobs. And I’m looking forward to getting back under it. I’d hate to find myself in a predicament that would potentially compromise what I’d like to achieve.”

On trying to stay out of trouble:

“You always encounter wankers and sometimes they get the better of you. I heard this saying about arguing with idiots. It goes: ‘Never fight an idiot. You’ll never win, because they bring you down to their level.’ So I’m trying my best not to be an idiot.”

Read the full article in the A/W ’15 issue of GQ Style, on sale on 24 September in print and as a digital download.

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2015 > British GQ Style
emily • 08.11.2015 • 0 Comments

DerbyTelegraph.co.uk – DERBY-BORN Hollywood star Jack O’Connell is to receive an honorary degree from his home university.

Jack, who will become an Honorary Master of the Arts, is one of six people to be selected by the University of Derby for the honours which will be presented next January.

The ardent Derby County fan said: “I feel a sincere level of gratitude for this honour I am presented with by the University of Derby. It’s an achievement, and one I feel I can be proud of. Up the Rams.”

Starting his acting life in productions at St Benedict Catholic Academy, Jack, 24, made his film debut in 2006 in This Is England – three years after he took the part of James Cook in Skins.

Jack’s film credits include Eden Lake, Private Peaceful and 300: Rise of an Empire. His breakthrough came when he gave critically acclaimed performances in the independent films Starred Up and ’71. Jack received consecutive nominations for the ‘Best Actor’ award at the British Independent Film Awards.

It was 2014 which saw him make the transition to Hollywood, taking his first leading role in the major studio picture, Unbroken.

The film directed by Angelina Jolie saw Jack portray Louis Zamperini, the Olympian athlete and Second World War veteran.

Jack received the New Hollywood Award at the Hollywood Film Awards. He was presented with the accolade at the ceremony in Los Angeles by Angelina Jolie, who famously introduced him with the East Midlands phrase, “ay up me duck”.

Jack also received the prestigious BAFTA Rising Star Award in 2015. Next year, he will be seen in Money Monster, a film directed by Jodie Foster, starring alongside George Clooney and Julia Roberts, and Tulip Fever with Alicia Vikander. He is due to start filming new project HHHH this year.

The other honorary degree recipients are: Rt Hon Sir John Mummery, a former Lord Justice of Appeal (Honorary Doctor of the University); Professor Ashwani Gupta, University of Maryland (Honorary Doctor of the University); Richard Gerver, former superhead and speaker (Honorary Doctor of Education); Donna Kellogg MBE, former Olympian and badminton coach (Honorary Master of the Arts) and Eileen Fry, former researcher and director of the Multi-Faith Centre at the University of Derby (Honorary Doctor of the University).

Each year notable people, with a strong connection to the university or to the city, are chosen to receive an honorary degree at the annual awards ceremonies, which is when the university’s students graduate after completing their courses.

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2015 > Derby Telegraph
emily • 05.17.2015 • 0 Comments

VARIETY.COM – Julianne Moore and Variety’s Steven Gaydos were on hand to honor rising stars Jack O’Connell (“Unbroken”) and Lola Kirke (“Gone Girl”) at the elegant Chopard Trophy ceremony that took place on the rooftop of the Martinez Hotel on Friday night.

“When you start out all you know is that you want to do it, it feels good to do it and you would do it for free but what you don’t know if you’re any good. But when you see a good actor, you can see it right away. And we saw Jack O’Connell and Lola Kirke immediately the minute they burst onto the screen, they’re beautifully alive on camera, it’s palpable their talent,” said Moore. “We’re so happy to have you, we’re excited to see your work and we know we’re going to see your work for many years to come,” added the Oscar-winning actress.

Gaydos concurred, “At Variety we have a great time introducing new talent, celebrating new talent because films become regenerated by them, and the Cannes Film Festival is the centerpiece of this regeneration. Masters leave us and new masters arrive — and it’s especially true in acting.”

Kirke was visibly moved by the honor and quipped that she hadn’t realized the turn that her career had taken until two days ago when she found herself on the red carpet at a Cannes premiere.

The Chopard Trophy ceremony, for which Variety is the exclusive media partner, drew Cannes Film Festival’s president Pierre Lescure and general delegate Thierry Fremaux, as well as actress Lupita Nyong’o, Colin Firth and wife Livia Giuggioli, Emmanuelle Beart and Emma Watson, among other stars.

The Chopardd Trophy jury comprised Elizabeth Banks, “The Imitation Game” helmer Morten Tyldum, Gaydos, producer Jerry Weintraub, Amazon Studios’ head of production Ted Hope, and Chopard’s artistic director Caroline Scheufele, who announced the creation of a Chopard Foundation to support movies during the ceremony.

emily • 02.26.2015 • 0 Comments

One of the major pleasant surprises at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival, ’71, a gripping and thoughtful drama set in Belfast during The Troubles, hits theaters this Friday. The film stars soon-to-be-household-name Jack O’Connell as Gary Hook, a British serviceman trapped behind enemy lines during a night of intense sectarian unrest.

O’Connell may be best known for his work on the U.K. soap hit Skins, but 2014 set him on a trajectory for Hollywood’s A-list. While American audiences might have spotted him in 300: Rise of Artemisia, it was the critically acclaimed British prison drama Starred Up, and Angelina Jolie’s Unbroken that cemented O’Connell as the potential next “it” actor.

We caught up with O’Connell (and the film’s director, Yann Demange) back at TIFF to talk about what makes ’71 a unique war story, and how he’s handling the demands of movie stardom.
Check it out below, and enjoy!

How did you come to be attached to the film?
Jack O’Connell: Jina Jay, who cast ’71, I’ve got a good relationship with. So she made the right noises to Yann [Demange] and he just wanted to get together and meet me. It was like a straight-out offer, he had decided that I was his Gary, and he was going to make it work. That was flattering, it was the first time in my career that that had happened. So, beginning last year, I had three films, back-to-back. Well, one of which being Skins, but that kinda felt like a movie shoot as well. That’s how it came about, but it was very challenging to do three jobs, three very different characters, back-to-back.

What is it about the Hook character that makes him a unique centre for an action movie?
JO: I’d say because we see him as a human, we don’t know if he’s capable to get through it. He’s not a stone-faced killer, he’s not a savage. He loses his best mate, he’s got a relationship with his younger brother which is vital to him. He has to return, otherwise his brother’s f***ed. There’s no selfishness to him, so he’s got a good reason to get the f*** out of there. But he’s so out of his depth, and he’s a young lad. It’s quite plausible that’s been the case; if I was witnessing this as an audience member, I’d really appreciate the lack of bulls*** that we offer.

Do you think Yann’s accomplished that: a film free of bulls***?
JO: Yeah, yeah. We never try to perpetrate, or assume, or point fingers, or explain anything that hasn’t already been discussed. It’s not a revelation, hopefully we’re exposing the cost on ground level. We see the lack of animosity between Gary and, who were at the time, his enemies. And we see how brainwashing takes its toll, and how that then escalates into these conflicts.

It’s a hard film to pin down. What’s the first word that comes to your mind when you try to explain what it is to people?
JO: I hear the word “thriller.” But I never set out….or certainly on set, I didn’t feel like we were making a thriller. I guess in a word, it’s an “insight,” isn’t it? We’re portraying it on ground level, and we see costs like that. We throw out questions afterwards. So instead of boring an audience with low-budget cinema – with a portrayal of the politics and where this war started – we’re just in there. And it is thrilling, and that was Yann’s job, to provide that. But for me, I was portraying someone who, for as far as I was concerned, existed.

Did you film ’71 before or after Starred Up?
JO: After.

So did that make it hard to switch into a character that is very vulnerable and reactionary?
JO: Sure. That’s where Yann came in, and that’s why I’m here. With a lesser director I’d have been f***ed. So, I’ve come out here, mainly to support Yann because of his support for me during the shoot. He was always there to remind me when I was, perhaps, reverting back to something that I should have left in Belfast – funny enough, we shot Starred Up in Belfast, and then ’71 in Northern England. So that was his expertise, to have that sensibility, and enable and steer me in that way. I didn’t know the answers in this one, I don’t think anyone who’s in a realistic, life-threatening situation knows all the answers, you know?

Was Yann who you would go to when you didn’t have those answers yourself?
JO: Yeah. I mean, he was always available like that, but it wasn’t continuous. Sometimes I was trying to make my own mind up, and we had experts around the set as well. I knew the cinematography was going to be brilliant, because I trusted the people in charge. So there were all these elements in the film where I could find conviction, and I knew I was in a different beast all together, but it’s so f***ing physically enduring, that shoot. It was bad, man, I made myself ill.

What was straining you?
JO: The repetition of the running, stunts, and perhaps not the necessary attention to people’s safety. It results in bust-ups, and it wastes times. But I guess that’s all part of the process.

How’s it been handling all the publicity and work lately?
JO: Young as I am, 24, I started going out partying way before the legal age. I don’t have a lot of curiosity for that, I don’t feel any desire to be out on a Friday or Saturday night doing any of that s***. I think it’s very important the things I decide to do between work. So if I can just concentrate, knowing that I’ve got work coming up, if I can concentrate while I’m recouping myself, rejuvenate, it means I’ve got something to offer. It’s a full-time job, and I’ve always wanted to be here, but it’s a sacrifice.

What are you hoping people are going to be saying once they’ve seen the film?
JO: I just hope they feel like they watched a lot of honesty onscreen. I hope they feel enlightened by that version of honesty, not glorification of war. We all have a responsibility in this industry to tell proper stories amidst entertainment. I hate the term “war porn,” I f***ing hate that terminology. I find it insensitive, quite beyond belief. But it exists, and I’m going to be steering clear of war porn.

I don’t think anyone would accuse ’71 of that title, but it was Truffaut who said there’s no such thing as an anti-war film. Would you say ’71 is trying to be an anti-war film?
JO: It’s a depiction of war. In that sense, it can’t be an anti-war film, because otherwise it would so blatantly be an anti-war film that it doesn’t become interesting. We have to make out own minds up during that depiction. We certainly don’t glorify it, and the idea isn’t to tempt anyone into finding themselves in that situation, but again, we wanted to provide a reasoning for people on either side. All too often, you don’t see both sides of the story portrayed at the same level of attention and decency. I don’t think we can be accused of that.

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emily • 02.06.2015 • 0 Comments

Having made a name for himself on Channel 4’s epic teen drama Skins it was only a matter of time before the film world took notice of Jack O’Connell’. One of his earlier film roles was as the king of the killer chavs in EDEN LAKE. A film which had O’Connell and his friends stalk middle-class Michael Fassbender and his wife as they went on a relaxing camping trip. Since then O’Connell has graced our screens in a variety of genres with last year (2014 in case you’ve forgotten already) featuring many chances to see Jack on the big screen as he starred in 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE, STARRED UP, ’71 and UNBROKEN.

We recently interviewed Jack O’Connell about his EE Rising Star BAFTA nomination and the young actor seemed to be taking it all in his stride, apparently happy to speak to a fellow Midlander. We kicked the interview off discussing the local area, where you can get an under-age pint (very naughty), and the heated rivalry between our home-town football teams (Derby County and Nottingham Forrest). Here’s what he had to say:

Congratulations on your nomination.

Thank you!

How are you feeling?

I’m upbeat. I’m very upbeat. But apparently these things can’t define you. One way or another I hope to keep on working. Should that [winning] be the case lovely, if I’ve got the Rising Star award in my repertoire. But if not I can’t be crying myself to sleep about it can I?

Does this one mean a little bit more because it’s voted for by the general public?

It’s the fans, it’s home soil. I guess the previous honouries the Will Poulter’s, the Tom Hardy’s the James McAvoy’s of this world, Noel Clarke, you know homegrown talent. I’d personally like it to go to someone homely. But I guess that benefits me to say.

Everybody, even nominees, winners obviously, but even nominees have all gone on to have really successful careers; Cillian Murphy he was a nominee but didn’t win but has had a great career.

He’s one of my favourites is Cillian. Since WIND THAT SHAKES THE BARLEY. Is that what he got nominated for? Brilliant film.

It was the year that THE WIND THAT SHAKES THE BARLEY was released yes. You’ve mentioned in the past that Tom Hardy is someone that you aspire to. He’s a previous winner, are you hoping to emulate him?

Nope.

No?

No I love his work. You know I like him as a person, but I’ve gotta do my own thing haven’t I? Tom has his strengths, I perhaps have mine in other fields. No I don’t like modeling it on any others.

You’re the second Skins alumni to be nominated, Nicholas Hoult was nominated previously.

Got ya?!

So who out of the rest of the Skins cast do you think could be in your shoes in a few years time?

I think Sean Teale is a good little actor. He was in the generation after ours. I think he’s a good little actor. I think in my opinion who impressed me the most was Ollie Barbieri. Because he’s not JJ, he’s not socially awkward, well perhaps slightly, but what to be able to comprehend that Asperger’s essentially. To play it convincingly you only saw JJ on camera. He constructed a f**king very recoginisable, instantly recognisable character. Lily Loveless I think is a stunning actress too. And that’s just to name three names.

You could name pretty much anybody from Skins though, it was such a good show.

They chose us wisely.

Last year was pretty busy for you, you were in a lot of films, what’s next?

A film comes out this year called TULIP FEVER, which is seventeenth century Amsterdam during the tulip bulb boom. I’m looking forwards to seeing what that does, primarily because I love history. It was a lot of fun delving into that. Then you have after that, yeah next jobs in February. I’m in a thing called MONEY MONSTER with Jodie Foster directing me. But hopefully in the time in between a short film which I did immediately after TULIP FEVER with Holliday Grainger, who we were love interests with before anyway. We then went onto this short film together it’s CGI’d up. This geezer called Kibwe Tavares and a producer called Dan Emmerson they are really exciting me man. F**king brilliant little film makers. It’s great to after all the experiences of last year be back in at grass roots level carrying the set around and mucking in that way.

So no break then?

I think that’s what Christmas was want it? So I better get stuck in. I’m getting agitated actually.

If you think that Jack should win the prestigious award and follow in the footsteps of James McAvoy, Tom Hardy and Eva Green then make sure you cast your vote here.

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emily • 02.04.2015 • 0 Comments

Great news! Jack is set to attend the BAFTA Film Awards this Sunday, February 8th! Let’s hope he wins!

Benedict Cumberbatch, Michael Keaton and Reese Witherspoon are among the stars attending this year’s EE British Academy Film Awards.

Nominees attending this weekend’s ceremony will include Amy Adams, Patricia Arquette, Steve Carell, Ralph Fiennes and Ethan Hawke.

The Theory of Everything duo Felicity Jones and Eddie Redmayne will be in the audience, alongside Edward Norton, Keira Knightley and Julianne Moore.

Rising Star nominees Jack O’Connell and Gugu Mbatha-Raw are also set to attend, as are Rosamund Pike, Mark Ruffalo, Rene Russo, JK Simmons and Imelda Staunton.

Meanwhile, David Beckham has been confirmed as one of the presenters of this year’s prizes.

He will be joined by Hayley Atwell, John Boyega, Henry Cavill, Sam Claflin, Natalie Dormer, Chris Evans, Alice Eve, Phoebe Fox, Martin Freeman and Cuba Gooding Jr.

Holliday Grainger, Olivia Grant, Sally Hawkins, Tom Hiddleston, Nimrat Kaur, George MacKay, Dougray Scott, Kristin Scott Thomas, Mark Strong and Julie Walters will also take to the stage.

The Grand Budapest Hotel leads the nominations this year, with Birdman and The Imitation Game also securing multiple nods.

It was recently confirmed that Mike Leigh will receive the BAFTA Fellowship during the ceremony.

The 2015 BAFTAs will take place on Sunday (February 8) at London’s Royal Opera House, with Stephen Fry hosting for the 10th time.

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